Placenta Endocrine Function - Anatomy & Physiology

From WikiVet English
Jump to: navigation, search
Created by the veterinary profession for you - find out more about WikiVet

Did you know you can edit or help WikiVet® in other ways?

NEW CONTENT!
Infographic short version.jpg


The Placenta is a hugely important endocrine organ, producing many hormones which affect the status of pregnancy and the maternal physiology.


Hormones of the Placenta
Hormone Production and Regulation Action
Prostaglandin F2a Produced towards the end of pregnancy in increasing amounts to allow for parturition. Causes luteolysis and promotes uterine contractions.
Progesterone The Placenta takes over Progesterone production from the Corpus Luteum to maintain the pregnancy. Maintains the pregnancy by thickening the cervix, depressing the maternal immune response and preventing ovulation. It also promotes mammary growth.
Oestrogen Oestrogen levels rise throughout pregnancy as the placenta grows. Stimulate the growth of the myometrium, promote mammary development and suppress gonadotrophin release from the pituitary gland.
Placental Lactogen This is related to Prolactin and Growth hormone, and is produced by the placenta and uterus. Promotes growth and differentiation of mammary tissue. Identified in primates, ruminants and rodents.
Equine Chorionic Gonadotropin (eCG) This is produced by foetal trophoblast cells, and is actually the same molecule as equine LH. Prevents luteal regression and is thus the signal for Maternal Recognition of Pregnancy in equids.
Human Chorionic Gonadotropin (hCG) This is produced by foetal trophoblast cells. Prevents luteal regression and is thus the signal for Maternal Recognition of Pregnancy in primates.


WikiVet® Introduction - Help WikiVet - Report a Problem